Netflix Doesn’t Need Hollywood Anymore

Written by Mitch Santell

netflix

The shift started in 2013 with the premiere of House of Cards. Netflix, in my opinion, does not need Hollywood anymore nor does the company care what Hollywood thinks.

Some will say that Netflix is just producing big-budget Tell-Lie-Vision shows. My take? There is something much bigger happening. Think of Netflix as the Apple, Inc. of streaming. Why do I think that? Answer: Apple listens to its customers, and it would appear that Netflix is doing the same thing.

My experience of Netflix on a Mac or a PC is substantially better than my Apple TV not because Apple TV does not work, it is the interface. It is the fact that Netflix has incorporated their algorithm into everything that you watch on their service.

netflix buster
“Buster, He’s A Beautiful Boy!” 

Check out what I found:

Netflix vs. Cannes: Will the Company’s Original Content Succeed Without Hollywood Approval?

For those who haven’t browsed the Netflix catalog recently, the streaming service has taken a page from Hollywood studios and dived headlong into the production and distribution game. Its name is on titles with big stars like Adam Sandler and Will Smith — these stream alongside the company’s popular TV series like Stranger Things and Lost in Space.

It’s important for Hollywood studios to project an air of prestige around their more ambitious projects, and events like Cannes also provide gobs of free publicity. But the tussle between Cannes and Netflix arose from a recent change in the festival’s rules. A new regulation mandates that for a film to play in competition, it must have theatrical distribution in France.

That’s a tough one for Netflix, as French law stipulates there has to be at least a three-year gap between a film’s theatrical run and its debut in home entertainment such as streaming services. Almost needless to say, that’s a no-go for a company whose success relies on streaming content.

The screen goes dark

For those who haven’t browsed the Netflix catalog recently, the streaming service has taken a page from Hollywood studios and dived headlong into the production and distribution game. Its name is on titles with big stars like Adam Sandler and Will Smith — these stream alongside the company’s popular TV series like Stranger Things and Lost in Space.

It’s important for Hollywood studios to project an air of prestige around their more ambitious projects, and events like Cannes also provide gobs of free publicity. But the tussle between Cannes and Netflix arose from a recent change in the festival’s rules. A new regulation mandates that for a film to play in competition, it must have theatrical distribution in France.

That’s a tough one for Netflix, as French law stipulates there has to be at least a three-year gap between a film’s theatrical run and its debut in home entertainment such as streaming services. Almost needless to say, that’s a no-go for a company whose success relies on streaming content.

In reaction to the festival’s new rule, Netflix withdrew the five titles it planned to unveil at Cannes. Since then, the two sides have had few positive words for each other.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/2IKjmrf

netflix yes

Living room vs. movie theater

The dispute benefits neither party. It makes the festival look reactionary and old-fashioned in a film and entertainment world that’s rapidly changing. And Netflix appears to be playing the role of intolerant Silicon Valley disruptor — our way is the future, and if you’re not on board, forget you.

In its movie-making efforts, Netflix has fewer allies. That’s no surprise, given its insistence on debuting its feature films in theaters and on the streaming site simultaneously (its big-budget fantasy action movie Bright was to open in a grand total of two cinemas in the U.S.).

Read more here: http://bit.ly/2IKjmrf

Yes, I said yes! Netflix is onto something big and we all know it.

netflix more
Shall we binge watch a series?

If the miss the old days of going to a Movie Theater, here is a little reminder.

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